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THE CHILD VICTIMS ACT IS PASSING IN NEW YORK JANUARY 28TH 2019!!!!!!!!!

AMAZING NEWS!!!

THE CHILD VICTIMS ACT IS FINALLY SET TO PASS SENATE IN N.Y.

THIS YEAR 1/28/19!

After over 25 years of political advocate groups, victims, nonprofit organizations and Senators this bill is finally passing in N.Y. legislation! There were so many groups that fought hard, scarified their time and money diligently trying to have this bill approved. One of the main forces that helped the CVA get passed was Gary Greenberg of Protect NY Kids. He is a fellow victim/ advocate and an amazing humanitarian. He has gone above and beyond to make sure that not only past victims but future victims to come rights are protected.

Along with Gary's perseverance there are 2 Senators in N.Y. that need to receive a lot of praise for sponsoring and pushing until the Child Victims Act was finally approved to be passed on 1/28/19. Senators Brad Hoylman & Linda Rosenthol are the main sponsors and supporters of this bill. Without the combined efforts of these 2 Senators, Gary Greenberg, Bridie Farrel (U.S. Athlete) Stop Abuse Campaign, Kevin DeBlasi, Asher Lovy, (as well as my Nonprofit Justice for the Forgotten and Futures Americans) and so many others the Child Victims Act bill may have just been another law brushed under the carpet year after year.

The passing of the Child Victims Act is a step in the right direction but it only covers one aspect of childhood abuse…sexual. As detrimental as that can be there are also other forms of abuse that can affect a child for the rest of their lives! Abuse ranging from sexual, physical, mental, verbal, neglect, maltreatment of any kind should NOT have any type of statue of limitations placed on it. The long term consequences of ANY form of abuse have the same outcome. Statistically proven most victims of abuse suffer from as follows:

Effects- Child abuse and neglect affect children now and later. (According to the CDC)

  • Improper brain development

  • Impaired cognitive (learning ability) and socio-emotional (social and emotional) skills

  • Lower language development

  • Blindness, cerebral palsy from head trauma

  • Higher risk for heart, lung and liver diseases, obesity, cancer, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol

  • Anxiety

  • Smoking, alcohol

Physical

  • In 2014, approximately 1,580 children died from abuse and neglect across the country—a rate of 2.13 deaths per 100,000 children.1 Abuse and neglect during infancy or early childhood can cause regions of the brain to form and function improperly with long-term consequences on cognitive and language abilities, socioemotional development, and mental health.3 For example, the stress of chronic abuse may cause a “hyperarousal” response in certain areas of the brain, which may result in hyperactivity and sleep disturbances.4,5

  • Children may experience severe or fatal head trauma as a result of abuse. Nonfatal consequences of abusive head trauma include varying degrees of visual impairment (e.g., blindness), motor impairment (e.g., cerebral palsy) and cognitive impairments.6

  • Children who experience abuse and neglect are also at increased risk for adverse health effects and certain chronic diseases as adults, including heart disease, cancer, chronic lung disease, liver disease, obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and high levels of C-reactive protein.7,8,9

Psychological

  • In one long-term study, as many as 80% of young adults who had been abused met the diagnostic criteria for at least one psychiatric disorder at age 21. These young adults exhibited many problems, including depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and suicide attempts.10 The stress of chronic abuse may result in anxiety and may make victims more vulnerable to problems, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, conduct disorder, and learning, attention, and memory difficulties.4,5

Behavioral

  • Children who experience abuse and neglect are at increased risk for smoking, alcoholism, and drug abuse as adults, as well as engaging in high-risk sexual behaviors.7,11

  • Those with a history of child abuse and neglect are 1.5 times more likely to use illicit drugs, especially marijuana, in middle adulthood.12 Studies have found abused and neglected children to be at least 25% more likely to experience problems such as delinquency, teen pregnancy, and low academic achievement.13 Similarly, a longitudinal study found that physically abused children were at greater risk of being arrested as juveniles, being a teen parent, and less likely to graduate high school.14

  • A National Institute of Justice study indicated that being abused or neglected as a child increased the likelihood of arrest as a juvenile by 59%. Abuse and neglect also increased the likelihood of adult criminal behavior by 28% and violent crime by 30%.15

  • Child abuse and neglect can have a negative effect on the ability of both men and women to establish and maintain healthy intimate relationships in adulthood.16

Economic

  • The total lifetime economic burden resulting from new cases of fatal and nonfatal child abuse and neglect in the United States in 2008 is approximately $124 billion in 2010 dollars. This economic burden rivals the cost of other high profile public health problems, such as stroke and Type 2 diabetes.17

  • The estimated average lifetime cost per victim of nonfatal child abuse and neglect was $210,012 (in 2010 dollars), including

  • Childhood health care costs

  • Adult medical costs

  • Productivity losses

  • Child welfare costs

  • Criminal justice costs

  • Special education costs

The estimated average lifetime cost per death is $1,272,900, including medical costs and productivity losses.17Research suggests the benefits of effective prevention likely outweigh the costs of child abuse and neglect.

So as previously mentioned the Child Victims Act is a tremendous step in the right direction.

It however is not enough to handle the issues at hand that our society is suffering from.

Dealing with the repercussions of child abuse especially if the victim never received justice is a debilitating, horrific nightmare. A lot of the misfortunes faced later in life can be improved if the problem is addressed at the source. So by removing the statute of limitations completely it will alleviate negative effects on us as a society and as individual victims of abuse.

SO PLEASE HELP ME FIGHT FOR THE RIGHTS OF OUR CHILDREN, PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE!

PLEASE SIGN & KEEP SHARING MY PETTION

(CREATED BY JUSTICE FOR THE FORGOTTEN AND FUTURE AMERICANS INC./

REBECCA MADIGAN)

PLEASE CLICK THE PETITION LINK BELOW OR COPY & PASTE INTO YOUR BROWSER

https://www.change.org/p/john-flanagan-remove-the-statue-of-limitations-on-all-forms-of-child-abuse/w?source_location=notifications_page&comment_id=749411489#comment_749411489

TO FIND OUT MORE DETAILS ABOUT THE CHILD VICTIMS ACT FROM

GARY GREENBERG NY PROTECT KIDS

CLICK THE LINK BELOW

https://www.facebook.com/gary.greenberg.94/viceos/10210657936044384/

https://www.facebook.com/1827562375/posts/10210621176765425/

Contact:

Andrew M. Cuomo

Governor of New York State NYS State

Capitol Building Albany, NY 12224

(518) 474-8390

Email: gov.cuomo@chamber.state.ny.us

Senator John J. Flanagan:

DISTRICT OFFICE

Address: 260 Middle Country Rd Suite 102,

Smithtown, NY 11787

Phone: (631) 361-2154

Email: flanagan@nysenate.gov

ALBANY OFFICE

Room 330, State Capitol Building

Albany, NY 11247

Phone: 518-455-2071

Email: flanagan@nysenate.gov

Together we can help make a difference. Please Email, Call & Sign the Petition.

PLEASE ADD MY WEBSITE, FACEBOOK & TWITTER PAGES

LIKE SHARE AND HELP SPREAD THE WORD

WEBSITE: https://www.justicefortheforgottenandfutureamericans.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JUSTICEFORTHEFORGOTTENANDFUTUREAMERICANS/

GOFUNDME:https://www.gofundme.com/manage/REBECCAJFFA

Twitter: https://twitter.com/RebeccNY

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rebeccanyli/

Please help me make a positive change for the innocent children, the forgotten and the future.

Below you will find pictures of my family before our lives were torn apart

Approximately 1979-1982 Long Island N.Y.